Discover the World News Forecast . . . FIRST in Foresight Journalism

Terracotta warrior tomb researchers, pain scientists among Asturias Award laureates

October 22, 2010 - SPAIN

Prince Filipe of Asturias presents eight 2010 Asturias awards at a ceremony in Oviedo. The laureates include the Chinese archeological team at the Museum of Terracotta Warriors and Horses in Xi'an; a French-Lebanese author honored for portraying Mediterranean culture as a symbolic space of coexistence and tolerance; three scientists - two Americans and an Israeli - for pioneering pain research; an American sculptor; two noted European thinkers; and organ transplant specialists.

Prince Filipe of Asturias presents eight 2010 Asturias awards at a ceremony in Oviedo. The laureates include the Chinese archeological team at the Museum of Terracotta Warriors and Horses in Xi'an; a French-Lebanese author honored for portraying Mediterranean culture as a symbolic space of coexistence and tolerance; three scientists - two Americans and an Israeli - for pioneering pain research; an American sculptor; two noted European thinkers; and organ transplant specialists. The Chinese team received the 2010 Prince of Asturias Award for Social Sciences for their research into the site of terracotta warriors, which the jury described as one of the most important archaeological discoveries of the 20th Century and a rich source of information about the Chinese civilization. The project began in 1974. Amin Maalouf received the 2010 Prince of Asturias Award for Letters, according to the Foundation, for managing to lucidly address, through historical fiction and theoretical reflection, the complexity of the human condition. He published his first work, The Crusades Through Arab Eyes, in 1983. The book examines this period in history from an Arab perspective. The Prince of Asturias Awards Technical & Scientific Research was awarded to David Julius, Professor and Chair of the Department of Physiology at the University of California, San Francisco, for a pioneering study of the molecular mechanisms of nociception, work described as leading to a greater understanding of pain intensity; Linda Watkins, a biochemist and physiologist who is Professor of Psychology at the University of Colorado in Boulder, for studies that reveal why certain analgesic treatments do not succeed in reducing pain; and Baruch Minke, a Professor of Medicine at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, for a study of the molecules that underlie the role of nociceptors in pain. American Richard Serra, described as one of the most relevant avant-garde sculptors in the second half of the 19th century, will receive the Prince of Asturias Award for the Arts "for his innovative vision of incorporating urban spaces in pieces of art that entice people to reflect." The jury awarded the Prince of Asturias Award for Communication and Humanities to Alain Touraine, a Frenchman, and Zygmunt Bauman, a British-Pole, as two of the highest representatives of current European thought. They have analyzed the deep transformations of contemporary social structures and have developed key concepts for the understanding of fundamental issues of our time, the jury noted. The Transplantation Society and the Spanish National Transplant Organization will receive the Prince of Asturias Award for International Cooperation. Both organizations stand out for their crucial work in establishing the medical and ethical principles that govern clinical care and scientific research on organ transplantation, according to the jury. The Asturias awards for Sports and Concord will be announced in following weeks. Over 200 candidatures from forty-six countries were in contention for the 2010 awards. Winners receive a EUR 50,000 prize and a reproduction of a statuette designed by Joan Miró. Recent Asturias laureates include Google and author Margaret Atwood in 2008, and singer-songwriter Bob Dylan in 2007. ;

Prince of Asturias Foundation

Date written/update: 2010-10-22