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NEW YORK 3 Apr 2013 The modern mobile phone turns 40
On 3 Apr 1973, while walking in New York City, Motorola employee Martin Cooper placed a call to rival AT&T’s Bell Labs on a Motorola DynaTAC, which

April 30, 2013 - NULL

NEW YORK 3 Apr 2013 The modern mobile phone turns 40
On 3 Apr 1973, while walking in New York City, Motorola employee Martin Cooper placed a call to rival AT&T's Bell Labs on a Motorola DynaTAC, which is regarded as the first mobile telephone. The 40th anniversary of the historic call invites a Google doodle and a look at technologies that reduced the devices from house-brick size to playing-card size while increasing the range and trimming production costs. Most of today's models are whip-smart, data and video ready, razor-thin and loaded with aps that

NEW YORK 3 Apr 2013 The modern mobile phone turns 40
On 3 Apr 1973, while walking in New York City, Motorola employee Martin Cooper placed a call to rival AT&T's Bell Labs on a Motorola DynaTAC, which is regarded as the first mobile telephone. The 40th anniversary of the historic call invites a Google doodle and a look at technologies that reduced the devices from house-brick size to playing-card size while increasing the range and trimming production costs. Most of today's models are whip-smart, data and video ready, razor-thin and loaded with aps that are transforming daily life, most notably the field of medicine.

The search engine recent marked the 78th birthday of Robert Moog, an electronic music legend, with a playable doodle.

There is hardly a field or area of the world untouched by mobile telephony, and some of the most spectacular advances are being made in mobile health--MHealth. A CNN report in Feb 2012 notes that some of the world's best-known telecoms brands are partnering with health-sector companies to enter the medical field. From the range of news about developments, it seems the potential of MHealth is near limitless.

The same CNN web page runs an ad for MobiUS SP1 smartphone ultrasound system, which is promoted by the manufacturer as having the potential to bring ultrasound technology to remote rural areas. Discovery News reported in Nov 2009 that new research by American and Australian scientists aims to diagnose respiratory diseases by analyzing a cough made into a cell phone. And more recently, TV network ABC reported on a study that is assessing how accurately emergency medicine practitioners diagnose wounds based on photos taken by patients on their mobile phones. Many observers of the MHealth phenomenon project a day when it will be unnecessary for a patient to travel to his or her physician.

None of these developments would have been possible until phones were small enough to fit a small adult hand and the cost of the units came down to pennies, relatively speaking. Public use and the ubiquity of the devices awaited lower production costs. Prior to 1973, cellular systems were not easily portable because they required large power-storage units, and the DynaTAC of Cooper's call cost US $3500. (WRITTEN May 2012)

RELATED READING:

Development of cellular systems (Encyclopedia Britannica)
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1482373/mobile-telephone#toc279851

Cell Phone Pictures May be the Next Medical Diagnostic Tool (ABC 17 Dep 2010)
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/WellnessNews/cell-phone-pictures-tool-pre-er-diagnosis/story?id=11655227

Cough Into Your Cell Phone, Get Diagnosis (Discovery News 8 Nov 2009)
http://news.discovery.com/tech/cough-cell-phone-diagnosis.html

Mobiles and medicine: The brave new world of mHealth (CNN 29 Feb 2012)
http://www.cnn.com/2012/02/29/tech/mobile-health/index.html

Date written/update: 2013-04-30