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GENEVA 20 May 2013 WHO convenes 66th Assembly
The 194 countries that make up the World Health Assembly resolved their commitment to meeting measles and rubella elimination goals on Friday by creating

April 20, 2013 - NULL

GENEVA 20 May 2013 WHO convenes 66th Assembly
The 194 countries that make up the World Health Assembly resolved their commitment to meeting measles and rubella elimination goals on Friday by creating a new Global Vaccine Actions Plan (GVAP). The 66th Assembly will look at an progress with the project, which has already seen gains, and will have some good news about smoking and dismaying news about cancer to consider.

The WHO notes that the ultimate goal of the GVAP is to prevent more than 20 million deaths in the next decade by increasing vaccination access. Thus far, efforts to

GENEVA 20 May 2013 WHO convenes 66th Assembly
The 194 countries that make up the World Health Assembly resolved their commitment to meeting measles and rubella elimination goals on Friday by creating a new Global Vaccine Actions Plan (GVAP). The 66th Assembly will look at an progress with the project, which has already seen gains, and will have some good news about smoking and dismaying news about cancer to consider.

The WHO notes that the ultimate goal of the GVAP is to prevent more than 20 million deaths in the next decade by increasing vaccination access. Thus far, efforts to increase vaccinations in children have led to a 74 per cent decrease in worldwide measles-related deaths to 139,000 between 2000 and 2010.

Priority geographic areas for increased vaccination now include sub-Saharan Africa and India, according to the WHO. The initiative recently launched its new Global Measles & Rubella Strategic Plan 2012-2020. Its new measles surveillance system can provide support to achieving the goals of the new GVAP.

Tobacco kills almost 6 million people every year and is one of the leading preventable causes of illness and death around the world, according to the WHO. On previous World No Tobacco Days -- May 31 -- public health officials have been unable to tell if the program was effective in encouraging people to stop smoking. The good news is that a way has been found - using the Google search engine results - to measure the effectiveness of the program, and gains in awareness of the need to stop smoking are being seen. According to a VOA report, the information will help the health ministries in countries provide better online information on World No Tobacco Day to help people kick the smoking habit.

The good news-bad news that comes from the International Agency for Cancer Research (IARC) is that health authorities are make increasing headway in treating infectious diseases in the developing world, but, in doing so, they are trading one problem for another. The Los Angeles Times notes that as people live longer, they become more likely to develop chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes. A recent IARC study suggests that the incidence of cancer worldwide will grow by 75 per cent by the year 2030, nearly doubling in some developing countries. Those increases will put a much larger burden on the poorly developed healthcare systems in such countries because care of cancer is much more expensive than care for infectious diseases. (WRITTEN JUNE 2012)

RELATED READING:

World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/en/

World No Tobacco Day Proven Successful (VOA 1 Jun 2012)
http://www.voanews.com/content/world-no-tobacco-day-is-proven-success/1146171.html

World cancer incidence will grow 75% by 2030, WHO says (LA Times 1 Jun 2012)
http://www.latimes.com/news/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-world-cancer-incidence-20120601,0,4763342.story

Date written/update: 2013-04-20