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CORRECTIONS: The 13th Dalai Lama proclaimed Tibet’s independence in 1913 after expelling the Chinese presence following the collapse of the Qing dynasty in China. Tibet’s incorporation into the People

February 13, 2013 - NULL

CORRECTIONS: The 13th Dalai Lama proclaimed Tibet's independence in 1913 after expelling the Chinese presence following the collapse of the Qing dynasty in China. Tibet's incorporation into the People's Republic of China began in 1950, and Beijing shows no interest in easing its controversial military and cultural grip on the now- Tibet Autonomous Region. World leaders who add their voices on Feb 3 to Tibetan demands for more autonomy can count on the ire of Beijing, which will be alert to prevent any new uprising by Tibetans and self-immolations in the region. For Beijing, the suicides protesting the Chinese

CORRECTIONS: The 13th Dalai Lama proclaimed Tibet's independence in 1913 after expelling the Chinese presence following the collapse of the Qing dynasty in China. Tibet's incorporation into the People's Republic of China began in 1950, and Beijing shows no interest in easing its controversial military and cultural grip on the now- Tibet Autonomous Region. World leaders who add their voices on Feb 3 to Tibetan demands for more autonomy can count on the ire of Beijing, which will be alert to prevent any new uprising by Tibetans and self-immolations in the region. For Beijing, the suicides protesting the Chinese presence have drawn more unwelcome world attention to the so-called Tibet issue. There will be interest in whether the new Chinese government will take a softer line.

WORLD 13 Feb 2013 Tibetans mark centenary of independence movement
The 13th Dalai Lama proclaimed Tibet's independence in 1913 after expelling the Chinese presence following the collapse of the Qing dynasty in China. Tibet's incorporation into the People's Republic of China began in 1950, and Beijing shows no interest in easing its controversial military and cultural grip on the now- Tibet Autonomous Region. World leaders who add their voices on Feb 3 to Tibetan demands for more autonomy can count on the ire of Beijing, which will be alert to prevent any new uprising by Tibetans and self-immolations in the region. For Beijing, the suicides protesting the Chinese presence have drawn more unwelcome world attention to the so-called Tibet issue. There will be interest in whether the new Chinese government will take a softer line.

The 14th Dalai Lama fled Tibet for India in 1959 after a failed uprising. He and the first elected leader of the Tibetan parliament-in-exile, Lobsang Sangay, are expected to preside over centenary events at the home of the parliament, in Dharamasala, India. Tibetan activists around the world will be attempting to solicit the help of governments in achieving self-determination. Activists of the New York-headquartered Students for a Free Tibet (SFT) plan to distribute copies of the scroll proclaiming independence to Chinese embassies around the world and to world leaders and posted on major landmarks.

Tibet occupies a high plateau surrounded by some of the world's highest mountains - its southern border is formed by the Himalayas. Encyclopedia Britannica notes two sides to the issue of who should control it. Many Tibetans consider China's incorporation of Tibet to be an invasion of a sovereign country, and the continued Chinese presence in Tibet is deemed an occupation by a foreign power. The Chinese believe that Tibet has been a rightful part of China for centuries and that they liberated Tibet from a repressive regime in which much of the population lived in serfdom.

Despite Chinese vigilance in Mar 2008, hundreds of Tibetan monks gathered in Lhasa to mark the 49th anniversary of a Tibetan uprising against Beijing rule. Protests and violence escalated. Rights groups said more than 140 people died, while Chinese authorities put the figure at 22 dead.

The Global Post notes that self-immolation, once unheard of in Tibetan society, has become a relatively common form of protest today. Since March 2009, there have been about 50 self-immolations in protest of China's repressive policies in Tibet and ethnically Tibetan areas of China. But, by most accounts, according to the publication, the repressive policies continue. Tibetan monks are still arrested and "re-educated." They are beaten and forced to denounce the Dalai Lama, and many disappear.

The pressure from many governments against what they regard as Chinese repression of Tibetan ethnicity has been largely ignored by Beijing, or else criticized as outside interference in Chinese affairs. The Chinese government changes in October, and critics of Beijing's Tibetan policies will watch for any signs of easing - or a bigger Chinese fist.. (WRITTEN AUG 2012)
RELATED READING:

Tibet (Encyclopedia Britannica)
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/594898/Tibet
Tibetan PM accepts his 'destiny' despite gruelling first term (Globe&Mail 20 Aug 2012)
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/tibetan-pm-accepts-his-destiny-despite-gruelling-first-term/article4490821/

Tibet: 50 self-immolations later (Global Post 21 Aug 2012)
http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/globalpost-blogs/chatter/tibet-50-self-immolations-later

Date written/update: 2013-02-13