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CORRECTION: YEMEN 21 Feb 2012 Transitional government plans presidential election. (The story was sent out with a 2011 date.)

YEMEN 21 Feb 2012 Transitional government plans presidential election

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February 21, 2012 - NULL

CORRECTION: YEMEN 21 Feb 2012 Transitional government plans presidential election. (The story was sent out with a 2011 date.)

YEMEN 21 Feb 2012 Transitional government plans presidential election

The government formed in December to oversee Yemen's transition from the three-decades-long rule Ali Abdullah Saleh plans a presidential election on 21 Feb. The victor could be hard-pressed to prevent civil war: the violent tussle for power is expected to continue regardless of who wins. As in Libya, an early challenge will be disarming both opponents and loyalists of the former president.

Saleh formally transferred his powers to his

CORRECTION: YEMEN 21 Feb 2012 Transitional government plans presidential election. (The story was sent out with a 2011 date.)

YEMEN 21 Feb 2012 Transitional government plans presidential election

The government formed in December to oversee Yemen's transition from the three-decades-long rule Ali Abdullah Saleh plans a presidential election on 21 Feb. The victor could be hard-pressed to prevent civil war: the violent tussle for power is expected to continue regardless of who wins. As in Libya, an early challenge will be disarming both opponents and loyalists of the former president.

Saleh formally transferred his powers to his deputy, Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, as part of a power-sharing deal sponsored by the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). His former deputy, with the backing of Saleh's General People's Congress (GPC) party, is an expected contender for the presidency.

Reuters notes that the result could be a government in which Saleh's opponents would have to share formal authority with his loyalists -- but without the military clout of the men they would effectively be trying to disarm. Key figures in the unfolding events will be Saleh's son Ahmed Ali Saleh, and nephew Yehia Mohamed Abdullah Saleh, who lead the Republican Guards and Central Security Forces, respectively, according to an expert quoted in the Reuters report. (WRITTEN Dec 2011)

RELATED READING:
Analysis: New Yemeni government hostage to military standoff (Reuters 8 Dec 2011)
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/12/08/us-yemen-government-idUSTRE7B71CY20111208

Hundreds of Thousands Protest in Yemen (WSJ 26 Nov 2011)
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204452104577061940913692120.html?mod
=googlenews_wsj

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Date written/update: 2012-02-21